Avoiding 10 Leadership Credibility Killers

Published September 8, 2015

Scott+Cochrane+CUScott Cochrane serves as the Vice President of International at Willow Creek Association. An insightful and genuine leader, he travels the globe coaching church leaders. Often, Scott serves alongside Bill Hybels, mentoring international teams. Prior to joining WCA, he was the Executive Pastor of a large church in Canada and provided leadership to the WCA Canada.

This post originally appeared on Scott Cochrane’s blog here.

 

Leadership is built on a foundation of credibility.

Take away a leader’s credibility and you’ve lost the platform from which leadership is built.

I’ve been focusing a great deal of late on the critical importance of credibility in leadership. And, as I’ve noted in the post from earlier this year, in my opinion, few leaders have captured the essence of this better than Bill Hybels.

While coaching a group of leaders in Hong Kong, Bill sounded a loud warning against what I am calling, “credibility killers.”

Bill-1

A leader had asked Bill, “What would you say about a problem I have that I believe is hurting my leadership? At work, I tend to have a very bad temper and I think it is hurting my effectiveness.”

Bill let the comment hang in the air a moment or two then responded with wisdom, clarity and kindness.

“First of all,” Bill began, “thank you for the vulnerability you have shown in asking such a question. That shows courage. Now, to your question about losing your temper. I have two words you need to hear: Understandable and Inexcusable.”

Bill went on to explain, “That lack of control will undermine your leadership to the core. It’s understandable in that anger is a very human emotion. But it’s inexcusable in that when your teammates see you lose control, your credibility takes an enormous hit.”

Immediately, I scrawled this line across my notebook, “Consistently losing your temper is a credibility killer.”

But I would later fill my page with what I reflected were other credibility killers. Credibility killers happen when leaders consistently:

  1. Fail to follow through on commitments
  2. Tell half-truths
  3. Avoid hard conversations
  4. Not put in a full day’s work
  5. Blame others when goals are not met
  6. Display a lack of competence in key functions
  7. Belittle others
  8. Claim credit for others’ work or ideas
  9. “Spin” bad news
  10. Display arrogance

This list is merely the tip of the credibility iceberg.

The reality is, credibility is the currency of leadership. Without it, effective leadership becomes almost impossible.

This is why, I believe, Bill took the time to patiently explain the vital importance of this principle.

And it’s why every leader needs to take a close look at any credibility killers that might be eroding their leadership effectiveness.

Because when credibility is gone, it’s tough to get it back.

What would you add to this list?

About the Author
Scott Cochrane

Scott Cochrane

Vice President of International

Global Leadership Network

Scott Cochrane serves as Vice President of International at the Global Leadership Network. An insightful and genuine leader, he travels the globe mentoring international teams. Prior to joining the GLN, he was the executive pastor of Trinity Baptist Church in Kelowna, British Columbia and provided leadership to the Global Leadership Network Canada.

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