Published September 22, 2020

Ep 079: Leadership & the Race Conversation, Part 2 Dr. David Anderson and David Livermore Ph.D.

TOPICS IN THIS PODCAST

DiversityLeading Others

Our nation continues to be stirred by racial injustice and social unrest. At the Global Leadership Network, we recognize these universal issues require leaders to step up and engage. Research shows increasing diversity on teams and in every sector of society improves productivity and morale, adding value within organizations. In this episode of the GLS Podcast, we asked Dr. David Anderson and Dr. David Livermore to continue their conversation on racial and cultural intelligence. They explore the tough topics—institutional racism, the efficacy of protest, the concept of reverse-racism and what you can do to lead with truth and grace in this cultural moment.

Show Notes

SUMMARY:

Our nation continues to be stirred by racial injustice and social unrest. At the Global Leadership Network, we recognize these universal issues require leaders to step up and engage. Research shows increasing diversity on teams and in every sector of society improves productivity and morale, adding value within organizations. In this episode of the GLS Podcast, we asked Dr. David Anderson and Dr. David Livermore to continue their conversation on racial and cultural intelligence. They explore the tough topics—institutional racism, the efficacy of protest, the concept of reverse-racism and what you can do to lead with truth and grace in this cultural moment.

 

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • David Anderson’s BridgeLeader Network helps organizations deal with the deep divides of race and culture. Wherever there’s a divide, we put a table right there and have a conversation. 
  • David Anderson wanted to start a church where people from every race and culture could worship together.  
  • As a black man in America, there are certain things that are going to come my way. That’s reality. It doesn’t matter how much money you make, and it doesn’t matter how much of an athlete or mathlete you are.  
  • After Rodney King, I never thought that 22years later my son would be dealing with the same things. 
  • When I was nine years old, someone burned a cross in our front yard.  
  • When I was in high school, a kid called me the N-word on the bus every day.  
  • A couple of years ago, in my own neighborhood where I’ve lived 19 yearsI was pulled over because I made a neighbor “uncomfortable”. 
  • I don’t think there is such a thing as reverse racism. That would mean the whole system has turned over so that that white folk don’t succeed. If a white person feels discrimination, they should take that feeling and increase their empathy for people of color who feel it all the time 
  • There are two levels of racism: individual racism and institutional racism. 
  • Institutional or indirect racism means there are institutions and systems that are set up solely to push certain people in and certain people out. 
  • Institutional racism is prejudice plus power. 
  • The best friend of the black person right now is a camera phone.  
  • When black people protest, it usually gets labelled as violent unrest by white people. 
  • Colin Kaepernick kneeling for the flag is about as peaceful protest as you are going to get. And yet, it caused a controversy and he lost his job. 
  • Violence is wrong. Peaceful protest is what we’ve always tried to do. Sadly, it usually ends up with the most peaceful protester getting killed. Ask Martin Luther King. Ask Jesus Christ. 
  • Protests actually work. Within 10 days of sustained protest, Minneapolis banned the use of choke holds. Within 10 days of sustained protest, Dallas adopted a duty to intervene rule. Nobody was listening to the dude kneeling on the sidelines. 
  • When the BridgeLeader Network comes into a city, we pull together the six Ps: pastors, protestors, police, private sector business, public and private educators and politicians. When people get around the same table, solutions emerge because people get out of their own silos. 
  • Once they come together, protesters learn that the police respect their right to protest. And at the same time, the officers have a right to do their job as well. 
  • Gracism means that we are called to extend positive favor to other peopleregardless or maybe even because of their color, class or culture. 
  • Stay in relationships with people who are different than you across color lines and don’t isolate yourself to your racial groupThis is not the time to shrink back. 
  • For my white brothers and sisters who have said to me, “But doc, I try, and I don’t want to say the wrong thing. I just want to be a listener and I just want to be a learner.” Okaybut be courageous. It’s okay to be called a racist. I’ve been called the N word more times than you’ll ever be called a racist. 
  • Courage means you might be called a racist, it’s okay. But if that’s what it takes for this beast of systemic racism lose its power once and for all, then I’m willing to be a little bit uncomfortable. Stand with me. 
  • Be intentional about going to places where people are racially different from you. 
  • have to be a multicultural personbefore I can have a multicultural ministry 
  • Diverse readers are diverse leaders. 
  • Speak up to your own racial group right now. Whites need to talk to whites to help them. And I’ve got to talk to my people– black folk– and say, “Look, I know the pain. I feel it with you. God has called us to something even greater.” 

 

 

 

REFLECTION QUESTIONS:

1. Dr. David Anderson told several stories about racism that he has experienced in his life. How have you experienced or witnessed racism in your life? 

 

2. What did you think about Dr. Anderson’s comments on reverse racism and institutional racism? Do you see those issues as a problem? How do you think we solve issues that are systemic in nature? 

 

3. Dr. Anderson shared some practical things people could do to change to become more diverse in their leadership mindsets. Take a look at the list below and make a checkmark next to the actions that would be possible in your life. 

 

_________Stand with African American brothers and sisters in protest 

_________Use your power in your organization to promote greater racial inclusion 

_________ Intentionally build a relationship with someone of a different race 

_________Have a tough conversation and be willing to be called a racist 

_________ Intentionally go to places where people are racially different than you 

_________ Diversify your feeds by following people of a different race 

_________ Diversify your reading by purchasing books by authors of a different race 

_________ Talk to people in your own racial group about what you are experiencing 

 

4. Taking a look at your checkmarks, what isone thing you could do this week to increase your participation in the race conversation? Put a date in your calendar and do it! 

 

 

RESOURCES MENTIONED:

George Floyd 

Ahmaud Arbery 

Breonna Taylor 

Rayshard Brooks 

EDM DJ 

Rodney King 

Reverse Racism 

Martin Luther’s 95 Theses 

Martin Luther King  

Colin Kaepernick 

Samaritan Woman at the Well (John 4) 

Michael Brown 

Ferguson, Missouri 

Whirlpool Care Counts Program 

1 Corinthians 12 

Hurricane Katrina 

Harvard Business Review 

RELATED LINKS:

Dr. David Anderson 

Real Talk with Dr. David Anderson 

Letters Across the Divide: Two Friends Discuss Racism 

Gracism: The Art of Inclusion 

Bridgeway Community Church 

David Livermore, Ph.D. 

Driven by Difference: How Great Companies Fuel Innovation Through Diversity 

Cultural Intelligence Center 

The Global Leadership Summit

 

 

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