Published August 12, 2019

Episode 056: Jason Dorsey: Understanding Generational Differences

TOPICS IN THIS PODCAST

Leading YourselfProductivity

Jason Dorsey’s research into generations provides leaders with information to help build bridges in the workplace. In this episode, Summit Champion, Craig Groeschel, engages Jason in a fascinating conversation about generational differences, exploring nuances between the four different generations in today’s workplace. Walk away with specific strategies on how to reach younger audiences and build bridges of respect among the generations.

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SUMMARY:

Jason Dorsey’s research into generations provides leaders with information to help build bridges in the workplace. In this episode, Summit Champion, Craig Groeschel, engages Jason in a fascinating conversation about generational differences, exploring nuances between the four different generations in today’s workplace. Walk away with specific strategies on how to reach younger audiences and build bridges of respect among the generations.

 

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • When Jason Dorsey was 18, he wrote a book for the Millennial generation that became a best-seller.
  • Much of the story we hear about Millennials is simply not true.
  • A generation is a group of people born at about the same time and in about the same place.
    • Generation Z: Born 1996 and younger. They do not remember 9/11. Their parents are Generation X. They came of age during the Great Recession (2008-2009) and are practical with money.
    • Millennials: Born 1977 – 1995. Millennials are older than most people assume. They are delaying the historic markers of adulthood. They are tech-dependent.
    • Generation X: Born 1965 – 1976. Gen X came of age at a disruptive time of rising divorce rates, corporate layoffs and the AIDS epidemic. They tend to be more skeptical and are tech savvy. They are at a life-stage where they are parenting kids and caring for aging parents. Gen X retention is the most important data in the workplace right now.
    • Baby Boomers: Born 1946 – 1964. The massive generation born after World War II. Boomers are characterized by a high work ethic and willingness to pay their dues. They are the most influential generation right now.
  • To connect with younger generations in the workplace:
    • The first day on a job has never been more important
    • Provide specifics of the performance you expect
    • Provide frequent check-in style feedback
    • Use younger communication styles (emojis, Slack, etc. ) if they reflect your work environment and culture.
  • To connect with older generations in the workplace:
    • Maintain eye contact and take notes
    • Adapt to the communication style of older generations (email, phone calls, etc.).
  • To reach younger generations with your message and/or product:
    • Millennials want a unique experience and are video-driven.
    • Generation Z is interested in social purpose, value for their money and diversity.
  • To begin to work on generational issues in the workplace, create a generational snapshot. Then, figure out what is working and what is not and have candid multi-generational conversations.

 

REFLECTION QUESTIONS:

1. Do a quick generational snapshot of your team right now. List specific names in the four generational categories: Boomers, Xers, Millennials and GenZ-ers.

2.  Think about the people on your list. Are you clustered in one or two generations or is there generational diversity? Do the different people display typical generational characteristics?

3. Think about your customers or constituents. Are they clustered in one or two generations or is there generational diversity? What about your product appeals to them?

4. Based on Craig’s conversation with Jason, what is one thing you could do in the next week to:
a. Work better with your multi-generational team?
b. Reach a new generational demographic?

 

RESOURCES MENTIONED:

My Reality Check Bounced

Jason Dorsey on 60 Minutes

Morley Safer

9/11 Attacks

The Great Recession of 2008-2009

AIDS Epidemic in the U.S.

World War 2

Emojis

Slack

Snapchat

YouTube

Facebook

LinkedIn

RELATED LINKS:

Jason Dorsey

Center for Generational Kinetics

Craig Groeschel

Craig Groeschel Leadership Podcast

Life.Church

The Global Leadership Summit

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