Published February 3, 2020

Episode 066: Patrick Lencioni and Kim Simios on The Motive

You were encouraged to become a leader. You believe that leadership is the reward for all your hard work. However, now that you’ve attained the title, you find parts of the job to be really difficult—and you find yourself saying, “I didn’t sign up for this!” Patrick Lencioni suggests that you should examine your motive for becoming a leader in the first place. He says that leadership is not a reward. Instead, leadership is a responsibility and a burden worth bearing for others. You are not going to want to miss this convicting and insightful conversation drawing practical application from Pat’s newly-released book, The Motive.

Show Notes

Get free, instant access to GLS Podcast Episode Show Notes. Leverage episode summaries, key takeaways, reflection questions, resources mentioned, related links and applicable downloads.

 

SUMMARY:

You were encouraged to become a leader. You believe that leadership is the reward for all your hard work. However, now that you’ve attained the title, you find parts of the job to be really difficult—and you find yourself saying, “I didn’t sign up for this!” Patrick Lencioni suggests that you should examine your motive for becoming a leader in the first place. He says that leadership is not a reward. Instead, leadership is a responsibility and a burden worth bearing for others. You are not going to want to miss this convicting and insightful conversation drawing practical application from Pat’s newly-released book, The Motive.

 

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Too many people see leadership as a reward for their hard work.
  • Leadership is not a reward; leadership is a responsibility and a burden worth bearing for others.
  • Being a great leader means you’re willing to do the hard things in your organization that nobody else can do.
  • Most people fall into rewards-centered leadership unintentionally.
  • Revisit your intentions and motives for being a leader. Are you doing this because you want something out of it or because you want to serve others?
  • The omissions are essential elements of the leadership job that rewards-centered leaders may neglect to do.
    • Omission #1: Uncomfortable Conversations. It’s an act of negligence to avoid having difficult conversations when you are the person with the most influence.
    • Omission #2: The Work of Management. Every person on the planet needs to be managed. Rewards-centered leaders often excuse themselves by saying they don’t want to “micro-manage” or that they “trust” their people.
    • Omission #3: Preparing and Running Meetings. Meetings are the most important activity in an organization. It’s the leader’s job is to make them better.
    • Omission #4: Team-Building. If you are signing up to be a leader, you are the chief team-building officer.
    • Omission #5: Repeating Themselves. Leaders need to be chief reminding officers. The very best leaders constantly reinforce the same message over time, over years.
  • If you’re job is all fun and you are not being burdened, your probably not doing all the things that are required of you. That’s especially true when you are a leader.
  • Leadership requires doing things when and how other people need them. It’s a privilege but also a burden.
  • Just because someone is good at their job, doesn’t mean they should be a leader.
  • Leadership should not be a noun—something you acquire. It should be a verb—something you do.
  • When you decide you are willing to be burdened for your organization, everything gets easier and better.

 

 

REFLECTION QUESTIONS:

1. In this conversation, Patrick Lencioni discussed five omissions that rewards-centered leaders often neglect to do. These are the parts of the leadership job where you might be tempted to say, “I didn’t sign up for this.” Think about your own leadership. Which of the omissions are the most tempting for you to neglect? Check all the boxes that apply.

 Omission #1: Difficult Conversations
 Omission #2: The Work of Management
 Omission #3: Preparing and Running Meetings
 Omission #4: Team-Building
 Omission #5: Repeating Themselves

2. Look at all the boxes you checked. If you are being completely honest with yourself, do your responses indicate that you may not be leading for the right reason? Have you fallen into the trap of rewards-centered leadership?

3. What would it look like if you could shift your perspective on the omissions you checked—and look at them as your leadership privilege and burden? How would your attitude change? How would your schedule change?

4. Commit to reflecting on your motives for leadership and making adjustments if necessary.

 

RESOURCES MENTIONED:

What’s Your Motive? Patrick Lencioni 2019 GLS Talk

The Motive: Why So Many Leaders Abdicate their Most Important Responsibilities

Alan Mulally

Ford Motor Company

Gary Kelly

Southwest Airlines

Matt Maher

“You’re not in Kansas anymore.”

Amy Hiett

Meg Whitman

RELATED LINKS:

Patrick Lencioni

The Table Group

At the Table with Patrick Lencioni Podcast

Kim Simios

Ernst & Young

The Global Leadership Summit

Show Notes are Exclusively for Podcast Subscribers

Enter your email address to unlock them instantly


We welcome and encourage comments on this site. There may be some instances where comments will need to be edited or removed, such as:

  • Comments deemed to be spam or solely promotional in nature
  • Comments not relevant to the topic
  • Comments containing profane, offensive, or abusive language
  • Anonymous comments

If you have any questions on the commenting policy, please let us know at heretoserve@globalleadership.org

THURSDAY-FRIDAY, AUGUST 6-7, 2020Register for the 2020 Global Leadership Summit

$129*

*Price as low as $129 per attendee for groups of 2 or more and $149 per attendee for individual(s). Not valid for South Barrington.

You are located in: US
Let's Connect

“We welcome and encourage comments on this site. There may be some instances where comments will need to be edited or removed, such as:

If you have any questions on the commenting policy, please let us know at heretoserve@globalleadership.org”

Select your location

Select your location